The Wall Street Journal recently told 82-year-old Aldea Campbell’s harrowing story. She lives alone in a house twenty years older than she is. It’s one of the more ancient homes in Maine, where the winters are fierce. The only way she can afford to heat her house, though, is to burn wood in the cellar.Senior woman lying at bed

That means waking herself several times each night and climbing down the steep cellar steps to load the wood burner. Then it’s back up the stairs again, hoping her slippers don’t slip. Twice already, they have. Luckily, she got up with little more than a bruised tailbone.

All things considered, Aldea is relatively healthy. That’s why she can stay at home. She can’t afford nursing homes, and that’s why she chooses to stay at home.

It’s called aging in place, and more seniors than ever are choosing it for the very same reasons — they’re healthy enough to get by alone, and it’s much cheaper. Many of them would opt for some kind of senior care or assisted living if they could swing it.

Mind you, aging in place isn’t exactly free. Seniors have substantial healthcare costs, no matter where they live.

This is the part of aging no one wants to talk about — the price tag. It isn’t cheap.

That’s why a big part of our practice here at Bixler Moore, LLC is helping seniors and their families adequately prepare for the potential financial challenges of the future.

Proper planning can create priceless peace of mind. That makes any home a happier one. Call our Canton elder law attorneys to learn more about how we can help.

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